Bath Attractions Guide
A guide to the best Attractions in Bath...

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey Heritage Vaults, Bath Abbey, Bath. BA1 1LT
Tel : +44 1225 422462 - Fax : +44 1225 429990

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Bath Abbey stands at the heart of the city of Bath, during the past twelve and a half centuries, three different churches have occupied this site:

An Anglo Saxon Abbey Church dating from 757, pulled down by the Norman conquerors of England soon after 1066;

A massive Norman cathedral begun about 1090. It was larger than the monastery could afford to maintain and by the end of the 15th century was in ruins;

The present Abbey church founded in 1499, ruined after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539 by order of Henry VIII.

It was restored and has been supported ever since by successive generations of those whose church it has been and by other benefactors.

The Bath Abbey 2000 campaign of restoration and conservation has continued that tradition. Bath Abbey is now an active parish church in the Church of England. In 1999 it celebrated its five hundredth anniversary.

Inside the Abbey

The Bath Abbey 2000 cleaning and conservation programme has revealed the contours and the true colour of the Bath stone of which the Abbey is constructed. Overhead, a fan vaulted ceiling, designed in the early 16th century, runs the full length of the building. At the East end, above the altar, stained glass in the huge window illustrates the Bible story of the life of Jesus Christ.

The West Front

Begun in 1499, Bath Abbey is the last of the great medieval churches of England. The West Front is unique. It depicts the dream that inspired the Abbeys founder, Bishop Oliver King, to pull down the ruined Norman cathedral and raise the present building on its foundations.

The cleaning of the West Front was the first of the Bath Abbey 2000 projects to be completed.

The Abbey Opening Times

Weekdays

From Easter Monday until the end of British Summer Time 9.00 am until 6.00 pm.

From the end of British Summer Time until Easter Monday 9.00 am until 4.30 pm.

Sundays

1.15 pm until 2.45 pm during the winter months and in addition from 4.45 pm until 5.30 pm during the summer months. The Abbey is also open on Sundays for six services.

The Heritage Vaults

The Heritage Vaults Museum occupies cellars which belonged to houses that once stood alongside the Abbey. These houses were pulled down in 1833 and the cellars were abandoned until opened up as the Abbey's museum in 1994.

Bath Archaeological Trust excavated the whole floor area before the museum opened.

A graveyard was found as well as traces of the Norman cathedral and its cloister walk dating from he 12th century.

The Vaults are fully air-conditioned and comfortable to visit throughout the year

The Vaults Opening Times

The Vaults are open to visitors from Monday to Saturday from 10.00 am until 4.00 pm, (last entries 3.30 pm).

They are closed on Sundays, on Good Friday and during Christmas Week.

Admission Charges :

The Bath Abbey is open to all and there is no charge to enter.

Vistors are asked to give a voluntary donation of £2.50, which is entirely optional.

Introductory talks / guided tours will be arranged on request at no extra charge.

Disabled visitors: A lift is provided to take disabled visitors down to the museum.

Activity trails for children are always available.

Researchers are welcome: Enquiries are dealt with individually, in person or by post.

Service Times

Holy Communion 8.00 am
Parish Communion 9.15 am
Choral Matins and Sermon 11.00 am
Holy Communion 12.15 pm
Choral Evensong 3.15 pm
Evening Service and Sermon 6.30 pm

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Ghost Walks

Ghost Walks of Bath, 9 Minerva Court, St Johns Road, Bath, BA2 6PL
Tel : +44 1225 463618 - Fax : +44 117 909 9941

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Ghost Walks of Bath will take you to many famous places noted for their strange events. Apart from experiencing first hand the charm of this wonderful city and its Georgian buildings, you can sample the atmosphere and imagine the situations which set the stage for so many strange events which have been so well documented.

Visitors from all over the World visit Bath when in the UK and join our tours which are an enlightening experience. They take in this splendid city and watch the mysteries unfold and perhaps feel just a sprinkling of fear!

Thousands of people over the years have enjoyed our walk, many of whom have come back time and again to relive the stories we tell. Local people and people from all corners of the World have experienced the mystical history of the City of Bath against the beautiful backdrop of its Georgian architecture.

Since 1974 when the walks were first established by a local historian and psychic, the Ghost Walks of Bath have been well noted by the local and National press and have been featured many times on American, Irish and British television.

Walks take place :

1st April to 31st October from Monday to Saturday.

1st November to 31st March on Fridays only.

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Great Pulteney Street

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The celebrated architect Thomas Baldwin constructed Great Pulteney Street in 1789, at the behest of Sir William Pulteney. After designing the new Pump Room, Baldwin started construction on Great Pulteney Street. At 1100 feet in length and 100 feet wide, it is Baths most impressive street.

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Henrietta Park

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Henrietta Park, a 7 acre park is named after Henrietta Laura Pulteney, and was opened to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897. The Royal Victoria Park was named for Queen Victoria but after a single visit in 1819 she never had the pleasure again.

It contains many fine trees, extensive shrubberies and beautiful flower beds. There is also an exquisite landscaped Garden of Remembrance dedicated to George V.

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Jane Austen Centre

40 Gay Street, Queens Square, Bath, BA1 2NT
Tel : +44 1225 443000 - Fax : +44 1225 443000

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The Jane Austen Centre is a new permanent exhibition which tells the story of Jane's Bath experience - the effect that living here had on her and her writing.
Jane Austen is perhaps the best known and best loved of Baths many famous residents and visitors.

She paid two long visits here towards the end of the eighteenth century, and from 1801 to 1806 Bath was her home.

Her intimate knowledge of the city is reflected in two of her novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, which are largely set in Bath.

The city is still very much as Jane Austen knew it, preserving in its streets, public buildings and townscapes the elegant well ordered world that she portrays so brilliantly in her novels.

Now the pleasure of exploring Jane Austens Bath can be enhanced by visiting the Jane Austen Centre in Gay Street. Here, in a Georgian town house in the heart of the city, the visitor can find out more about Bath in Jane Austens time and the importance of Bath in her life and work.

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Museum of Costume

Museum of Costume, Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath, BA1 2QH
Tel : +44 1225 477789 - Fax : +44 1225 444793

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Follow the story of fashion, from the late sixteenth century to the present day, at Bath's internationally acclaimed Museum of Costume. Dressed figures and displays of fashion accessories show how styles have changed for men, women and children. Marvel at the delicate stitching, exquisite colours and varied textures of the fabrics.

Embroidered garments of the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods, the famous silver tissue dress (a rare survival from the 1660s) and a perfect miniature of an eighteenth century court dress are some of the treasures on view. Exhibits change regularly and there is a special programme of exhibitions.

An award winning audio tour of the Museum of Costume and Assembly Rooms is offered in seven languages free of charge. The audio guides can be adapted for visitors with impaired hearing. A script of the audio tour is also available on request. Guided tours can be arranged for groups.

The museum keeps up to date with modern fashion. Each year a leading expert chooses a Dress of the Year to represent the most important new ideas in contemporary style. Selections include Mary Quant, Jean Muir, Giorgio Armani, John Galliano and Alexander McQueen.

The Museum of Costume shop has an extensive collection of books on fashion and its history alongside an excellent selection of gifts.

The Museum of Costume is open every day (except 25 and 26 December)
10.00 to 16.30 (last exit 17.00)

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Museum of East Asian Art

12 Bennett Street Bath BA1 2QL
Tel : +44 1225 464640 - Fax : +44 1225 461718

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Discover the art and culture of East Asian at the Museum of East Asian Art. Based in a restored Georgian building, this unique Museum houses a fine collection of Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Southeast Asian treasures.

The objects on display range in date from c.5000 BC to the twentieth century and reveal the finest achievements in East Asian craftsmanship.

Admission Charge :

Adults £4.00
Senior Citizens £3.50
Students £3.00
Family (2 adults and 2 children under 18) £9.00
Children (aged 6 to 12) £1.50
Children (under 6) FREE
Concessions available

Opening Times :

Monday: Closed all day (except some Bank Holidays)
Tuesday to Saturday: 10am until 5pm
Sunday: 12 noon until 5pm

Last admission to the Museum is at 4.30pm

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Parade Gardens

Grand Parade, Bath
Tel : +44 1225 482624

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These delightful gardens are Baths most centrally situated and popular pleasure grounds, attracting both tourists and residents.

Overlooking the River Avon they give fine views of Pulteney Bridge and the weir, especially from the colonnade built early in the century.

The bedding displays are among the finest in the country and the annual 3 dimensional carpet bedding in the Summer is unique.

Band concerts are held in the bandstand throughout the Summer months and children's entertainment is provided during the Summer holidays. There is a small entrance charge to non-Bath residents.

Opening Times :

Oct to Mar 10am to4pm
Apr to Sep 10am to 7pm

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Prior Park

Prior Park Landscape Garden, Ralph Allen Drive, Bath, BA2 5AH
Tel : +44 1225 833422

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Inspired by the entrepreneur and philanthropist Ralph Allen from about 1734 until his death in 1764, this 28 acre (11.3 hectare) 18th century landscape garden lies in a dramatic site running down a small steep valley to the very edge of Bath.

Ralph Allen continually landscaped, planted and gardened at Prior Park with the advice and influence of people like the poet Alexander Pope and Lancelot Capability Brown, who played a key role in the revolution of English garden design.

The mansion at Prior Park was built around 1740 for Ralph Allen and is now owned and used by Prior Park College. When Prior Park Landscape Garden was given to the National Trust in 1993 by the Christian Brothers and Prior Park College it had fallen into serious decay. The National Trust's restoration of the garden, based on historical, archaeological and ecological surveys, is being carried out with great expertise and care for historical detail.

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Pulteney Bridge

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Designed in 1771 in the Florentine style and built by Robert Adams, Pulteney Bridge is one of the most admired buildings in a beautiful city. It is one of only three bridges lined with shops in the world, but Robert Adam's creation has more than novelty value. His graceful composition is one of the unqualified successes of English Palladianism and provides the perfect integrating link between two halves of a Palladian city.

It consists of three lofty arches, and is surmounted on each side by handsome houses, so that no indication of a bridge is perceived by the person who passes over it.

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Queen Square

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Built between 1729 and 1739 this square was the first example of Georgian architecture built in Bath. Designed by local architect John Wood the Elder, its style set the tone for many subsequent buildings in the city. The obelisk in the square was presented to the city by wealthy resident Beau Nash, in recognition of a gift he received from Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales.

The fine architectural supremacy of the Circus and Royal Crescent can be easily reached from this landmark.

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Roman Baths and The Grand Pump Room

Roman Baths, Pump Room, Stall Street, BATH, BA1 1LZ
Tel : + 44 1225 477785 - Fax : +44 1225 477743

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Built approximately 2000 years ago and unearthed by the Victorians, the Roman Baths are fed by a warm spring that yields 250,000 gallons of water each day. The museum holds a fascinating collection of objects dropped into the baths by pious Romans including thousands of coins, metal cups, and a fine bronze brooch.

The Roman Baths is below the modern street level and has four main features, the Sacred Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman bath house and finds from Roman Bath.

The Georgian Pump Room is on the ground level and was regarded as the social heart of Bath for more than two centuries, this striking neo-classical salon is the place to which hot Spa water is drawn for drinking.

The Pump Room contains a number of curiosities, including the Tompion clock, given to the city in 1709 by Thomas Tompion, Englands best known clockmaker. You can also find sedan chairs here.

Today the Pump Room contains a restaurant that is open daily for lunch and light refreshments. Entertainment is by the Pump Room Trio and sometimes a solo pianist - a great place to wind down after a visit to the Roman Baths.

Opening hours :

The Roman Baths is open every day except for 25th and 26th December.

January to February and November to December
open 09.30
last entry 16.30, exit 17.30

March to June and September to October
open 09.00
last entry 17.00, exit 18.00

July to August
open 09.00
last entry 21.00, exit 22.00

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Royal Crescent

No.1 Royal Crescent, Bath, England. BA1 2LR
Tel : +44 1225 428126 - Fax : +44 1225 481850

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The Royal Crescent was built to the designs of John Wood the Younger between 1767 and 1774 and is justly considered one of the finest achievements of urban 18th century architecture and represents the highest point of palladian architecture in Bath.

The Royal Crescent met the individual requirements of wealthy and distinguished visitors to Bath and accordingly master craftsmen were responsible for the interior decoration to designs drawn from the many pattern books published at the time.

The foundation stone of Number 1 Royal Crescent was laid in 1767 and the house first leased to Thomas Brock in 1769. Among subsequent distinguished occupants, records show that the Duke of York, second son of George III, engaged the first house in the Royal Crescent in 1776.

By 1968 Number 1 was a lodging house and had fallen into disrepair. Major Bernard Cayzer, a member of the shipping family, acquired the house and gave it to The Bath Preservation Trust, who in turn provided funds for it's restoration. The house is now the headquarters of the Trust.

Only materials available in the 18th century were used. Visitors can now see a grand town house redecorated and furnished to show how it might have appeared in the late 18th century.

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Royal Victoria Park

Royal Victoria Park. Marlborough Lane, Bath BA1 2NQ
Tel : +44 1225 482624 - Fax : +44 1225 480072

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Below the Royal Crescent and stretching over 57 acres, this park of many parts has something for everyone regardless of age.

The Park was formed in 1829 and formally opened in 1830. It was named after the then 11 year old Princess Victoria, (the first ever park to carry her name) visiting Bath at the time. It was privately run until 1921 when it was taken over by the Bath Corporation.

Overlooked by the Royal Crescent, its 57 acres were originally laid out as an arboretum, and even today contains a superb collection of trees. Added to these are some fine Ornaments, beautiful bedding displays, Bowling green, Tennis courts, putting green, boating pond and 12 and 18 hole approach golf courses. It also contains the beautiful Botanical gardens, a bird aviary and a unique and incredibly popular children's play area laid out to emulate the city itself. All of these combine to make the park one of the most popular parts of Bath.

The Botanical Gardens :

One of the most delightful features of the Royal Victoria Park, the Botanical gardens were formed in 1887 and within their 9 acres is one of the finest collections of plants on limestone, certainly in the West country. Many choice trees, shrubs and a fine herbaceous border, a rock garden and pool, a scented walk and a collection of old shrub Roses and the building used by the City at the British Empire Exhibition held at Wembley in 1924 are just a few of the many attractive and interesting features of the garden.

To mark the centenary in 1987 the gardens were extended to include the Great Dell, a disused quarry and formally part of the park itself, already containing a large collection of Conifers. It has been developed into a woodland garden, and contains even more plants and features to add to this fascinating and beautiful
part of the park.

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Sally Lunns

Sally Lunns House, 4 North Parade Passage Bath, BA1 1NX
Tel : +44 1225 461 634 - Fax : +44 1225 811 800

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Sally Lunn, a young French refugee, arrived in England over 300 years ago. She began to bake a rich round and generous bread now known as the Sally Lunn Bun.

This bun became a very popular delicacy in Georgian England as its special taste and lightness allowed it to be enjoyed with either sweet or savoury accompaniments.

Many attempts have been made to copy our world famous Bun with little success.

Sally Lunns House has three floors available to experience the taste of the world famous Sally Lunn bun.

You can relive history in The Jane Austen room, Beau Nash room or if you prefer just sit on the ground floor looking through the bow window watching the world go by.

Then visit the fascinating museum in the cellars, where you can see the Roman and Medieval foundations of the house and the finds from the recent excavations. See the original kitchen with its faggot oven. Georgian range and old baking utensils.

Adjacent is the remarkable stalactite and stalagmite cellar.

The Museum is open daily from 10.00am

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Sydney Gardens

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Behind the Holburne Museum lies the large open grounds of Sydney Gardens, where visitors will find a neo classical folly, a quaint canal and the perfect place for a picnic. Steeped in history, this is the oldest park in the city, planned and laid out by the architect Harcourt Masters in 1795.

Sydney Gardens was developed as a pleasure ground in the late eighteenth century, with entertainments, swings (not permitted on Sundays), They were visited by many members of the Royal family and Jane Austen, who lived at near by 4 Sydney Place between 1801 and 1805 was a regular figure in the park, She wrote, It would be pleasant to be near the Sydney Gardens. We could go into the Labyrinth everyday.

Today the park contains fine trees, shrubberies, lawns and flower beds, tennis courts and a children's play area.

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The American Museum

The American Museum,Claverton Manor, Bath, BA2 7BD
Tel : +44 1225 460503 - Fax : +44 1225 469160

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In the late 1950s two American citizens, Dallas Pratt (1914-94), a psychiatrist, and John Judkyn (1913 to 63), an English born antiques dealer, had the idea of establishing a museum of American decorative arts on British soil the American Museum in Britain opened its doors to the public in July 1961.

With extraordinary dedication and sense of purpose the two founders had travelled throughout the US collecting objects intending to show how Americans lived in the past, to illuminate the present and to encourage international understanding. The founders, who lived near Bath, chose Claverton Manor as the location of their museum.

Designed by Jeffry Wyatville in 1820, and built on a hill above the River Avon, the large, thirty room mansion seemed ideally able to accommodate the host of artefacts they had collected. Now, over forty years since its opening, the American Museum in Britain is still the only museum of Americana outside the United States.

The American Museum is a non profit organisation dedicated to furthering the understanding of American culture and history to deepen and strengthen lasting ties between the two nations.

The museum is a spectacular series of diverse and authentically furnished rooms, tracing the American way of life from Colonial times to the mid 19th century.

Rooms showing how the Shakers lived, a stenciled bedroom, an elegant Greek Revival dining room, Native American artefacts and the finest collection of American quilts outside America are particularly popular.

Other galleries are devoted to Folk Art and outstanding American craftsmanship in pewter, textiles, silver and glass.

Mondays : Closed except during August and Bank Holidays.

Tuesday to Sunday : 12 to 5pm

Bank Holiday Sundays and Mondays : 12 to 5pm

ADMISSION PRICES

Museum, Galleries & Grounds

Adults : £7.50,
Seniors/Students : £6.50,
Children (5-16) : £4.00

Galleries & Grounds only

Adults : £5.00,
Seniors/Students : £4.00,
Children (5-16) : £3.00

Group rate for 15 people & over : £6.00 per person.

A lift has now been installed to give wheelchair access to all levels.

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The Assembly Rooms

The Assembly Rooms, Bennett Street, Bath, BA1 2QH
Tel : +44 1225 477785

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Baths magnificent 18th century Assembly Rooms were opened in 1771. Known as the New or Upper Rooms (to distinguish them from the older Assembly Rooms in the lower part of the town) they were designed by John Wood the Younger, the leading architect in the West Country.

This fine set of public rooms was purpose built for an 18th century form of entertainment called an assembly. A large number of guests met together to dance, drink tea, play cards and listen to music or just walk about, talk and flirt.

There are four rooms: the Ballroom, the Tea or Concert Room, the Octagon Room (linking all the rooms), and a Card Room.

The Assembly Rooms were seriously damaged in a bombing raid on Bath in 1942 but were rebuilt and reopened to the public in 1963. In 1987 part of the Ballroom ceiling collapsed due to a failure in the renewed plasterwork. The Rooms underwent further scheme of restoration and redecoration 1988 to 91.

Today, the building is owned by the National Trust but it is leased to and managed by Bath and North East Somerset Council. It is still used for a variety of public and private social functions.

The Ballroom

This is the largest 18th century room in Bath. Dancing was very popular and balls were held at least twice a week, attracting 800 to 1,200 guests at a time.

The high ceiling provided good ventilation on crowded ball nights and windows set at a high level prevented outsiders from looking in.

The Tea Room


This room was used for both refreshments and concerts in the 18th century (and was sometimes known as the Concert Room).

During the evening entertainments there was an interval for tea, the cost being included in the price of a ball ticket. On Sundays there were public teas when admission cost sixpence per person.

The Octagon and Card Room

The Ball Room and Tea Room are linked by the Octagon Room which was originally intended as a circulating space which could also be used for music and playing cards. On Sundays, when cards were not allowed, visitors could listen to the organ, which once stood in the musicians gallery.

Perhaps because more space was needed, a new Card Room was added in 1777 but the architect is not known. Today this room is used as a refreshment room and bar.

The Octagon Room is dominated by Gainsboroughs portrait of the first Master of Ceremonies at the Upper Rooms, Captain William Wade. (Baths most famous Master of Ceremonies, Richard Beau Nash, never knew this building as he died in 1761).

The Assembly Rooms are open to view when not in use for booked functions. It is advisable to check availability in advance.

Opening Hours :
Daily 10.00 to 17.00 (last admission 16.30).

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The Circus

The Circus, The Circus, The Circus, The Circus,

Beau Nash made Bath fashionable, Ralph Allen gave his administrative genius and blocks of Bath stone, but the great Georgian city would never have built without the brilliance of the architects John Wood and his son of the same name. With Allen as his patron, Wood the Elders dream was to build a city with the visual splendour and magnificence of ancient Rome.

The first foundation stone was laid on 18th May 1754 by Wood the Elder himself, Wood died before his dream was realised, but the work was superbly completed by his son. I proposed to make a grand Place of Assembly, to be called the Royal Forum of Bath, another place, no less magnificent, for the Exhibition of Sports, to be called the Grand Circus and a third place, of equal state with either of the former, for the Practice of Medicinal exercises, to be called the Imperial Gymnasium, Wood the Elder wrote.

Soon Queen Square and the Parades rose gloriously from the medieval city. Work began on the grand Circus, which was completed by Woods son. The Circus is the earliest attempted in Britain. Its bold and brilliant design amazed 18th century society. Similarly outstanding was Wood the Youngers Royal Crescent , the first open curved terrace built in Europe.

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The Holburne Museum

Holburne Museum of Art, Great Pulteney Street, Bath BA2 4DB
Tel : +44 1225 388588

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At the Holburne Museum you will find a beautiful and fascinating art collection in one of Bath’s great buildings. Our stunning new extension with its galleries and garden café opens onto the park behind us, serving fresh, seasonal lunches, delicious cakes and fairly traded coffee and tea.

With everything from Renaissance treasures to masterpieces by Gainsborough and from fine embroideries to exquisite silver there is lots to enjoy and explore. An exciting programme of events and changing exhibitions means there will always be something new to discover.

Spectacular new displays now show our collection as it has never been seen before. Admission is free and on every floor you’ll find new and inventive ways to explore our objects and discover many of the fascinating stories behind them.

We are 0.5 miles from the city centre, a 10 minute walk to one of the most enviable locations within the city. We sit within our own grounds, so there is plenty of room in which to walk and the Kennet and Avon Canal runs through Sydney Gardens, the park behind us.

We have a changing temporary exhibition programme for which there is a charge.

The Museum is fully accessible

We are open daily, free of charge, from 10am to 5pm and 11am to 5pm on Sundays and Bank Holidays

Closed 24, 25, 26 December and 1 January

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Thermae Bath Spa

Thermae Bath Spa, The Hetling Pump Room, Hot Bath Street,Bath, BA1 1SJ
Tel : +44 1225 33 1234

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The exquisite Hot Bath, designed by John Wood the Younger in the 18th century, has now been restored as a sanctuary of spa, health and well-being with sophisticated modern facilities.

The Hot Bath has recreated 12 purpose-built treatment rooms and its own natural thermal pool.

Options include :

Relaxing, revitalising face and body care treatments with botanically based Pevonia products.

Deep cleansing body wraps using Alpine hay, nutrient rich mud, Thalasso seaweed, creams and even Chardonnay.

Watsu : floating in the natural thermal waters while being massaged by a specialised therapist, wonderful experience.

In the New Royal Bath, glass, stone and light create a stunning location in which to unwind.

The modern design of Sir Nicholas Grimshaw's glass cube is sensitively interlinked with historic spa buildings. Natural energy conservation has been used throughout, with even the under-floor heating provided by the natural thermal waters.

The New Royal Bath contains two spectacular natural thermal baths, where mineral rich waters invigorate and calm. In the flowing curves of the Minerva Bath, whirlpools and neck massages aid your relaxation, while the open air rooftop pool has bubbling airbeds and breathtaking views of Bath and the surrounding countryside.

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Victoria Art Gallery

Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath, BA2 4AT
Tel : +44 1225 477233 - Fax : +44 1225 477231

Victoria Art Gallery, Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath, BA2 4ATVictoria Art Gallery, Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath, BA2 4ATVictoria Art Gallery, Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath, BA2 4ATVictoria Art Gallery, Victoria Art Gallery, Bridge Street, Bath, BA2 4AT

The Victoria Art Gallery is a free public facility located in the centre of the beautiful city of Bath. Open all year round, it is visited by 76,000 people annually.

The Gallery houses Bath and North East Somersets collection of paintings, sculpture and decorative arts. The building was designed in 1897 by a Scottish architect, John McKean Brydon. To celebrate Queen Victorias sixty years on the throne, it was decided to name the Gallery after her.

The Gallery opened to the public in May 1900. A year later, a monumental statue of the Queen was placed in a niche above the Bridge Street entrance, paid for from funds raised by the women of Bath.

The oil paintings in the Gallerys collection date from the fifteenth through to the twentieth century. Among them are works by painters who were active in the Bath area, including Thomas Gainsborough, Walter Sickert and J M W Turner.

The decorative art collection ranges from delicate eighteenth century wine glasses to a wonderful array of over 150 china dogs.


Opening hours :

The Gallery is open from Tuesday to Sunday all year round except 25 and 26 December.

Tuesday : Friday 10.00 to 17.30
Saturday : 10.00 to 17.00
Sunday : 14.00 to 17.00

We are closed on Mondays, with the exception of some Bank Holidays.

Admission is FREE

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